Posters

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  • Digital

    We have developed a software system (Bricks) for active teaching of introductory programming. It has been used and evaluated in 5 offerings of COMP 110 at UNC Chapel Hill, and has been shown to be effective at improving student comprehension of the subject. Moreover, it has been very well received by the students, with many calling the class fun, even one of the best they have taken. The main active learning principle in Bricks is that we learn best the things we do, not the things we read or have told to us. A student spends class time writing programs, doing what the instructor is showing them how to do. The programs are graded by the system as they write, providing instant feedback on success or misunderstanding. Students share their work with the class for discussion, and get real-time on-line help with coding questions from TAs during instruction.

    Resource Added: September 23, 2016

    Digital "Show-How": Active Methods for Teaching Programming 581KB, PPTX
  • Exams at Scale: A Computer-Based Testing Facility (CBTF)

    Exams in large classes are a logistical challenge, resulting in many classes using just two or three high-stakes exams in the semester and pushing instructors towards multiple-choice tests. We describe the development of an automated testing facility in which faculty upload randomizing and auto-grading questions and set exam windows (3 to 4 days) and then students self-schedule to take the test without faculty involvement. This is leading to significantly increased use of more effective testing strategies (frequent low-stakes tests, second-chance testing, complex question types), even in large classes.

    Resource Added: September 22, 2016

    Exams at Scale: A Computer-Based Testing Facility (CBTF) 4MB, PDF
  • Expanding engineering education to the incarcerated population

    There is growing consensus that the system of incarceration in the United States needs reform. The mission of the Education Justice Project is to create a model college-in-prison program that demonstrates the positive impacts of higher education upon incarcerated people, their families, the communities from which they come, and society as a whole. This poster describes how (and why) for-credit undergraduate engineering courses were taught in prison as part of the Education Justice Project.

    Resource Added: September 22, 2016

    Expanding engineering education to the incarcerated population 1MB, PPTX
  • Engineering the First Year of First-Year Engineering

    New FYE Program at the University of Kentucky

    Resource Added: September 21, 2016

    Engineering the First Year of First-Year Engineering 824KB, PPTX
  • Promoting Innovation by Encouraging the Participation of Students with ADHD in Engineering

    This poster presents an overview of two NSF-funded research and education projects aiming to improve the understanding of the challenges and unique potential of students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in engineering programs. Engineering education should capitalize on the unique strengths of neurodiverse students to promote creativity. Literature suggests that individuals with ADHD characteristics demonstrate unique creative potential. Despite this significant potential, these individuals are largely underrepresented in engineering programs due to the academic and emotional challenges imposed by the current rigid education structure. Changes need to be made in the way engineering is taught in order to make the field more welcoming to students with different thinking and learning styles. These projects are helping to generate the knowledge necessary for encouraging the participation of students with ADHD in engineering.

    Resource Added: September 20, 2016

    Promoting Innovation by Encouraging the Participation of Students with ADHD in Engineering 439KB, PPTX
  • Active Learning with Manipulatives in the Engineering Classroom

    This poster presents active learning strategies in the biomedical engineering classroom where students routinely use iClickers, and other active learning strategies to improve engagement and learning in the classroom environment. Active learning strategies are focused on peer instruction, encouraging students to teach eachother the material, clarify misconceptions, and get immediate feedback on their responses.

    Resource Added: September 20, 2016

    Active Learning with Manipulatives in the Engineering Classroom 15MB, PDF
  • Designing for the Next Generation of Engineers

    This poster presents a community-based engineering design challenge on STEM education into two first-year engineering courses by partnering with a local science center, Imagination Station. In project teams of four, students move through a design cycle. This innovation affects ~240 students per semester. They participate in need finding and problem scoping through visiting the science center as well as researching developmental stages of children to craft appropriate topics for the exhibits. Students engage in idea generation, concept reduction and selection through prototyping, and communication through final presentations to the director for Imagination Station. The best projects are constructed in the science center and provide ways to improve both the undergraduate student experience as well as the experience of local elementary and middle school students who may learn about engineering for the first time at this science center.

    Resource Added: September 20, 2016

    Designing for the Next Generation of Engineers 5MB, PPTX
  • Assessing Process and Diagrams in an Online Environment

    This poster presents an overview of a method for assessing process based learning in online courses. Students submit homework in an online homework system that automatically grades their final answer and provides minimal feedback. Students submit a carefully written version to an online dropbox where they are graded only on process and visuals. This dual submission method was used in 3 semesters of an online dynamics course offered at Michigan State University. The method is now used for in-class and online dynamics classes.

    Resource Added: September 20, 2016

    Assessing Process and Diagrams in an Online Environment 1MB, PPTX
  • Statistically Significant Learning: Integrating Project-based Learning in Engineering Statistics to Reveal its Relevance

    This poster presents an overview of how project-based learning was integrated into a 200-level engineering statistics course at Arizona State University in the Spring 2016 semester. The motivation theory guiding the course design choice is also described. A synopsis of the student outcomes are included along with challenges to implementing PBL and future plans to scale-up.

    Resource Added: September 20, 2016

    Statistically Significant Learning: Integrating Project-based Learning in Engineering Statistics to Reveal its Relevance 492KB, PPTX
  • Enhancing Engagement and Learning Through Hands-on and Experience-Based Education

    This poster presents an overview of several related hands-on learning activities developed for and targeted at achieving different learning objectives in different educational setting : K-12, undergraduate, and graduate. All of the modules developed to date have relied on providing students with active experience-based learning opportunities with the objective of enhancing key concept retention and student engagement. These types of activities are aimed at enhancing student learning by linking typical, often theoretical, course content to real-world quantifiable results.

    Resource Added: September 20, 2016

    Enhancing Engagement and Learning Through Hands-on and Experience-Based Education 2MB, PPTX
  • A foundational modern first-year EECS course

    This poster describes a new foundational course sequence 16AB for first-year EECS (and other engineering) students at UC Berkeley. This sequence has linear-algebra at its core while teaching students how to think like engineers and engage in design-thinking. Every theoretical concept is motivated and grounded in applications and an integrated lab allows students to have hands-on experiences that make physical the class concepts. Because the course is intended to be taken in parallel with an introduction to computation, students also engage with real data and simulations using IPython in both homeworks and labs. Around the linear-algebraic core, students learn basic circuits and systems concepts, but do so in the context of modern contemporary EECS rather than classical questions. This course has been successfully offered at scale (hundreds of students per semester) since Fall '15 and has been built to welcome intellectual diversity as well as a diversity of prior EECS exposure.

    Resource Added: September 20, 2016

    A foundational modern first-year EECS course 1MB, PDF
  • Back to Basics: Team Building Exercises to Promote Community and Compassion on Design Teams

    This poster describes two synergistic educational innovations: 1) team building exercises to promote better team dynamics, mutal respect and work ethics and 2) development of a compassionate design framework to help engineers end-user contexts. Since Spring 2014, the first innovation has been actively explored with positive results. To expand this work, additional assessment techniques are needed to measure the impact. Since Spring 2013, the second innovation has been under investigation. A recent NSF award and collaboration with a colleague in Engineering Education is helping to broaden these efforts and to consider impacts directly on students self-awareness and education.

    Resource Added: September 20, 2016

    Back to Basics: Team Building Exercises to Promote Community and Compassion on Design Teams 285KB, PDF
  • Making and Measuring  Progress in the Forgotten Steps of Design Education

    This poster describes work to teach students the "forgotten steps" of fabrication, testing, and iteration in the engineering design process. Rather than open-ended projects, students are trained in fundamental skills early in their education as engineers in order that they may be employed in design classes later in the curriculum. Psychometric measures such as creativity, self-efficacy, and self-concept are well-aligned to these efforts, and provide realistic indicators of our progress.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Making and Measuring  Progress in the Forgotten Steps of Design Education 4MB, PPTX
  • Entrepreneurship in Water Resources Sustainability

    This poster details an educational module that was developed to study entrepreneurship related to water resources sustainability. Two submodules were designed to explore the three components to successful entrepreneurship endeavors identified by the Kern Entrepreneurship Engineering Network: 1) curiosity, 2) making connections, and 3) creating value. The first submodule involves students working in groups to make presentations detailing innovative water resources technologies and identifying how those technologies made connections between different fields and how they created value for society. The second submodule involves students working in groups to explore some curious aspects of water resources planning and management.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Entrepreneurship in Water Resources Sustainability 1012KB, PPTX
  • Scholar/Mentor/Teacher Nucleus Model for High-Impact Nanoengineering Education

    My objective is to enhance parity of opportunity and educational outcomes through the foundation of integrated active mentorship experiences at both the student and pre-college educator levels. This poster will present the adoption of proven student-centered active learning techniques to nanoengineering research and education to enable more equal and efficient knowledge transfer of advanced concepts as well as the research career path.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Scholar/Mentor/Teacher Nucleus Model for High-Impact Nanoengineering Education 7MB, PDF
  • Student-created YouTube Videos:Enhanced Undergraduate Active Learning and Worldwide Outreach

    This poster describes a project where 36 groups of junior Chemical Engineering students were challenged to create informative and captivating YouTube videos of a transport phenomenon highlighting a mass or heat transfer principle that they learned in the ChE342 classroom or beyond. This innovative ChE342 course project has not only successfully transformed boring deductive classroom teaching into social sharing of engineering principles, but also led to the creation of a YouTube channel (http://tinyurl.com/FeiWenTIP) titled “The Fun of Mass and Heat Transfer” as a global outreach platform. Our qualitative and quantitative data have clearly demonstrated the effectiveness and statistically significant impact of this teaching innovation on student learning (Chemical Engineering Education, 50(3), 186-192, 2016). The YouTube channel already has viewers from 68 countries worldwide and STEM educator subscribers interested in replicating the video contents in their own high school classrooms.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Student-created YouTube Videos:Enhanced Undergraduate Active Learning and Worldwide Outreach 3MB, PDF
  • Sustaining the Engineering Education Ecosystem Through a “Research to Practice Co-Op”

    This poster describes a one-credit course, “Engineering and Science Education Research to Practice Co-Op,” designed to partner graduate students with expertise in engineering education research with other stakeholders in engineering education to design, implement and assess evidence-based practices. The goal is to strengthen connections and increasing awareness of interconnections between components of the education ecosystem (research and practice) to better sustain it.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Sustaining the Engineering Education Ecosystem Through a “Research to Practice Co-Op” 853KB, PPTX
  • From MOOC to Flip: Contrast of Student Interaction

    This poster presents work creating a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) and then using much of the content for flipping a class. This approach reduced workload by re-using existing content. While classes were well received, stark contrasts exist between student interaction and engagement.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    From MOOC to Flip: Contrast of Student Interaction 1MB, PPTX
  • Student-centered Engagement Strategies in Flipped and Traditional Engineering Classrooms

    This work outlines the transformation of the traditional classroom into a flipped classroom, using web-enabled technologies such as Camtasia-produced lectures and pencasts. Students watch online lectures and complete preview problems before class. They also submit Muddiest Point (MP) reflections online to elicit misconceptions and promote metacognition. In class, the instructor explains the MP concepts using an alternative strategy and uses team-based extension activities, such as concept mapping, to engage students in building conceptual frameworks and transferring knowledge. This work also outlines a guided-inquiry biomaterials lab which includes four modules for large lab sections focusing on key concepts. Educational innovations are assessed using measures of achievement, attitude, and persistence. Additionally, this works outlines strategies for dissemination using the “train the trainer” model.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Student-centered Engagement Strategies in Flipped and Traditional Engineering Classrooms 796KB, PPTX
  • Transforming Ordinary and Extraordinary Activities into “Education Worth Sharing”

    Culturally, students already use social media to share their thoughts, meals, crushes, dislikes, birthdays, everything -- except education. This work explores both transforming ordinary assignments and creating extraordinary assignments with sharing in mind in a theme of "education worth sharing". To date, student-created coursework has accumulated over 2,000,000 interactions.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Transforming Ordinary and Extraordinary Activities into “Education Worth Sharing” 1MB, PPTX
  • Introducing Entrepreneurship with the Internet-of-Things

    The number of students who want to participate in entrepreneurial endeavors is at an all-time high. However, from an education standpoint, there is much room for improvement how we prepare our engineering graduates to enter these types of ventures. For many programs, entrepreneurship is not a part of the core engineering curriculum. Students who want to learn about entrepreneurship for the most part have to either do so on their own or learn as they go, often times making costly, uninformed decisions as they begin their own startup companies. As a result of this arrangement, it is possible that we are not producing as many successful entrepreneurs as we could be. We are addressing this educational need by way of a new technical elective course that teaches students the fundamentals of entrepreneurship within the context of the Internet-of-Things.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Introducing Entrepreneurship with the Internet-of-Things 531KB, PDF
  • Entrepreneurship Education in Engineering Curricula

    One of the main challenges in engineering education is teaching students critical thinking and creative problem solving skills. One way these skills can be taught is by introducing an entrepreneurship-based final project. For the project, which is introduced at the start of the semester, students need to evaluate the knowledge they have gained throughout the semester to determine if a satisfactory solution already exists for an assigned societal problem. This approach engages students throughout the semester, provides them with an opportunity to apply their technical expertise, and promotes lifelong learning and societal engagement.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Entrepreneurship Education in Engineering Curricula 272KB, PPTX
  • Feedforward Learning Controls Improve Technical Mastery in the Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Laboratory Reports

    Chemical Engineering undergraduate laboratories challenge students to design and conduct experiments, analyze and interpret data, and demonstrate mastery of theoretical concepts within a summative written technical report. Feedforward Learning Controls utilizes formative assessment and refinement of the individual technical report elements, allowing for practice, feedback and revision prior to report grading. Individual assessment of writing skills, data processing and presentation skills, and core theoretical knowledge creates intervention opportunities at crucial junctions and ensures individual students have access to the tools needed to bridge the knowledge gap. The instructor and peers critique drafts and provide feedback, identifying errors and guiding students toward resources. This strategy reduces stress and enhances student competence, confidence and dedication. The result is enhanced student learning and dramatic improvement in the average written report quality.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Feedforward Learning Controls Improve Technical Mastery in the Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Laboratory Reports 522KB, PDF
  • Biomedical Device Design: learn by doing

    I have spearheaded the development of an experiential program at UC Irvine called BioENGINE (BioEngineering, Innovation and Entrepreneurship) to motivate students with real world problems and to provide them with hands on engineering skills / training. The BioENGINE program trains students to develop innovative healthcare solutions, biomedical devices, and wellness technologies to improve the lives of people in our community and across the globe. Through the rigorous team-based training and experiential learning that BioENGINE offers, students will become pioneers in a rapidly growing field that is revolutionizing medicine to advance human health.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Biomedical Device Design: learn by doing 12MB, PPTX
  • Accelerating the learning curve: Improving problem solving skills and technical communication in sophomore chemical engineers

    The transition into the engineering curriculum is challenging for students in many ways but particularly in the types and complexity of the problems to be solved. Additionally, this transition begins the process of introducing students into the particular language and means of communication they will build upon for the remainder of their degree and likely their career. By showing students the way with problem solving roadmaps and improving engineering communication with collaborative and iterative writing, this project focuses on accelerating this transition.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Accelerating the learning curve: Improving problem solving skills and technical communication in sophomore chemical engineers 746KB, PPT
  • DEVELOPING CREATIVITY AND ARTISTRY IN UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERS

    The engineering process is fundamentally creative and artistic, requiring the making of things that did not exist previously and that, ideally, possess attractive aesthetics. In most structural engineering curricula (and other engineering curricular generally), the essential and enjoyable aspects of engineering creativity, and its associated artistic qualities, are commonly overlooked and not instructed explicitly, even though the satisfaction of the creative and artistic processes are wonderful sources of inspiration for students to pursue studies and careers in STEM fields. The main objective of this activity is to incorporate explicit teaching and assessment of the creative process into the Structural Engineering Senior Design course at Northeastern University in Spring 2017.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    DEVELOPING CREATIVITY AND ARTISTRY IN UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERS 830KB, PPTX
  • A more student-centered electrical engineering classroom through pre-class reading and in-class problem solving

    There is ample evidence about the positive benefits of active learning, but lecture continues to be the prevailing pedagogy in most undergraduate engineering courses. Conventionally, the classroom is students’ first exposure to course content and one of the main goals of class time is to deliver information. This poster describes my efforts to flip that convention by shifting first exposure to occur before class, thereby allowing me to integrate active learning pedagogies into the class.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    A more student-centered electrical engineering classroom through pre-class reading and in-class problem solving 531KB, PPTX
  • Combining hands-on and online education

    This poster describes efforts to create introductory engineering courses that combine hands-on design with online education in order to create both a high-contact environment while managing large enrollments. We do this for introductory electrical engineering and computer science classes that focus on robotics, medical devices, and the Internet of Things.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Combining hands-on and online education 2MB, PPTX
  • Increasing Hands-On Technology Use

    Engineering careers require students to not only know how to use technologies but be able to teach themselves these tools as well. Additionally, students retain more knowledge from a course when they are actively engaged in the material through using technology, so I am working on providing opportunities to do so throughout Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Geometric Design, and Statistics courses.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Increasing Hands-On Technology Use 233KB, PPTX
  • Vertically Integrated Projects (VIP) Program at the University of Hawaii

    This highlights our institution’s efforts in developing a Vertically Integrated Project (VIP) Program. The University of Hawaii is part of the VIP Consortium, which consists of 21 institutions from around the world, led by Prof. Ed Coyle of the Georgia Institute of Technology. VIP Programs at each institution seek to foster long-term, in-depth, project-based learning to engage students and better prepare them for future careers. The objectives and desired outcomes for the UH VIP Program are: 1. Expand the VIP Program at UH to include more project teams (currently have eight teams). 2. Expand the range of disciplines involved (currently have Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Information and Computer Sciences). 3. Quantify the educational experience that VIP students receive, and maximize the benefits for the students.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Vertically Integrated Projects (VIP) Program at the University of Hawaii 1MB, PPTX
  • Scenario-Based Learning: Helping Students See Relevance

    This effort focuses on scenario-based learning which demonstrates professional relevance to students by having them emulate the role of an engineer. Through involvement with real cases, real tools, and real data, students see how knowledge and skills learned in the classroom can be synthesized and applied to actual engineering decisions. The goals of this effort are to increase students' engagement with engineering and prepare them for their professional pathways. - Samantha Brunhaver, Arizona State University

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Scenario-Based Learning: Helping Students See Relevance 476KB, PPTX
  • Flipping the Smartphone: Making Personal Electronics Work for the Educator

    This project focuses on a recent effort to productively use smartphones and other mobile smart devices in the classroom by engaging students through familiar neural pathways while simultaneously displacing distractive behavior linked to the ubiquitous devices.

    Resource Added: September 19, 2016

    Flipping the Smartphone: Making Personal Electronics Work for the Educator 2MB, PPTX
  • Active learning to engage students across disciplinary boundaries

    Explain less, do more… Redesigning a foundational course through active learning and team-based problem solving to create a sense of community and improve learning.

    Resource Added: September 18, 2016

    Active learning to engage students across disciplinary boundaries 11MB, PPTX
  • Merging bio and engineering:  project-based learning in undergraduate and graduate biomedical courses

    As the popularity of Biomedical Engineering at the undergraduate level grows, course content must be accessible by students with diverse backgrounds and learning styles. The objective of present effort is to develop courses that expose engineering students to signal processing methods, tools and important analytical techniques used in the study of neuroscience. For improving student engagement in classroom, the effort aims to design creative classroom and laboratory activities that allow for positive peer support.

    Resource Added: September 18, 2016

    Merging bio and engineering:  project-based learning in undergraduate and graduate biomedical courses 160KB, PPTX
  • Mechatronics and Robotics: A K—20 Continuum

    This effort is developing synergies in education, research, training, mentoring, and outreach within the interdisciplinary fields of mechatronics and robotics. Its outcomes are multifaceted and include i) students with demonstrated learning; ii) curricula to integrate education and research; and iii) broader audiences benefiting from an integrated ecosystem of K-12 STEM education programs.

    Resource Added: September 18, 2016

    Mechatronics and Robotics: A K—20 Continuum 4MB, PPTX
  • Making Learning Visible in Computer Science Classrooms

    There are a number of efforts to improve computer science (CS) classroom culture including those that seek to implement aspect of studio arts pedagogy . Using both maker activities and augmented reality, this work focuses on making the work of CS students visible and persistent in the classroom, similar to studio arts and design studios. The advantages of making student work visible include the opportunity for greater reflection, metacognition, learning communities and activation of prior knowledge.

    Resource Added: September 18, 2016

    Making Learning Visible in Computer Science Classrooms 3MB, PPTX
  • Metacognition, Study Habits, Learning, and Grades

    This effort is directed at exploring the role of self-efficacy and metocognition within the context of student study habits and strategies. Students are often not clear about the potential of their own confidence in themselves, their own study skills, strategies, and habits, and how these can impact their learning and grades.

    Resource Added: September 16, 2016

    Metacognition, Study Habits, Learning, and Grades 363KB, PPTX
  • Blended Dynamics – Does Size Matter?

    The current study is focused on the issue of scalability of a blended (flipped) classroom format undergraduate engineering Dynamics course.

    Resource Added: September 16, 2016

    Blended Dynamics – Does Size Matter? 40MB, PPTX
  • Tissue Engineering Startup Simulator: Integrating Entrepreneurship into Engineering Education

    Integrating an entrepreneurial mindset into a non-traditional engineering course to educate and promote entrepreneurship skills relevant to the field while promoting engineering design principles.

    Resource Added: September 16, 2016

    Tissue Engineering Startup Simulator: Integrating Entrepreneurship into Engineering Education 2MB, PPTX
  • Students to Engineers: Scaffolding from Cookbook Labs to Open-Ended Problems

    Redesigning a two-course lab sequence to gradually give students more choice and responsibility in projects, while focusing of professional skill development.

    Resource Added: September 15, 2016

    Students to Engineers: Scaffolding from Cookbook Labs to Open-Ended Problems 4MB, PPTX
  • Developing Engineering Students’ Professional Skills

    Designing a course and a digital badge program to develop and certify engineering students’ professional skills.

    Resource Added: September 14, 2016

    Developing Engineering Students’ Professional Skills 262KB, PPTX
  • Community-focused project-based learning in traffic operations

    Using project-based learning and community partnerships to improve engagement and understanding in a senior-level traffic operations course.

    Resource Added: September 13, 2016

    Community-focused project-based learning in traffic operations 162KB, PPTX
  • A New Engineering Discipline: Engineering Leadership

    Introduction of the Nation's First Degree in Engineering Leadership built upon a multi-disciplinary Engineering Core with emphasis in Leadership Development, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, and Business Acumen.

    Resource Added: September 12, 2016

    A New Engineering Discipline: Engineering Leadership 1MB, PPTX
  • Ethics in Design Practice: Integrating Ethics Education into Engineering Capstone Courses

    Proposal to integrate and rigorously apply ethical consideration and problem-solving skills into the practice of engineering design - Katherine Fu, Georgia Institute of Technology

    Resource Added: September 6, 2016

    Ethics in Design Practice: Integrating Ethics Education into Engineering Capstone Courses 239KB, PPTX
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